Nov 27, 2020  
2020-2021 Academic Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Academic Catalog

Anthropology and Sociology


Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Programs of Study

Faculty

Bradley A. Chase, chair and associate professor.
B.A., Northwestern University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison. Appointed 2008.

Allison D. Harnish, associate professor.
B.A., Western Kentucky University; Ph.D., University of Kentucky. Appointed 2013.

Scott A. Melzer, professor.
B.A., University of Florida; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Riverside. Appointed 2004.

Emily Pain, visiting assistant professor.
B.A., University of Oklahoma; M.A., University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., University of Albany, SUNY. Appointed 2019.

Matthew Schoene, assistant professor.
B.A., Villanova University; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University. Appointed 2016.

Lynn M. Verduzco-Baker, associate professor.
B.A., 1991, California State University, Fresno; M.A., 2009, Ph.D., 2011, University of Michigan. Appointed 2011.

Meghan Webb, assistant professor.
B.A., Centre College; M.A., California State University, Sacramento;  Ph.D., University of Kansas. Appointed 2018.

Our Mission

Anthropology and sociology are distinct disciplines united by a common interest in understanding humans and their communities. To this end, both programs focus on teaching majors, minors, and non-majors with the empirical methods, interpretive theories, and substantive findings of their respective disciplines that will allow them to understand the human condition across the full range of human global diversity—past and present. We pay particular attention to increasing students’ knowledge of how race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social class are socially constructed in particular environmental contexts through time. We teach students to think analytically, critically, and creatively and to express themselves effectively. We emphasize the importance of research skills that foster students’ intellectual abilities to master the applications of anthropology and sociology to prepare them for graduate school, for employment, and to bring about positive change in the world.

Career Opportunities

Knowledge and skills gained through the study of anthropology and sociology are valuable in everyday life and in a wide variety of careers. Training in anthropology and sociology may be especially valuable for students interested in pursuing careers in international business, public administration, market research, law enforcement, job counseling, human services, public health, international diplomacy, medical social work, foreign assistance, hospital administration, service agency planning, journalism and management.

A bachelor’s degree in anthropology/sociology prepares students for graduate study and employment in fields such as law, urban planning, labor relations, personnel management, hospital administration, corrections, school administration, public health and museum management, as well as research and teaching in the fields of anthropology and sociology. Recent graduates from the department have become biostatisticians, urban planners, lawyers, biological anthropologists, congressional staff workers, physicians, nurses, news reporters and church field staff workers.

Student Learning Outcomes

Anthropology Major/Minor

  1. Empirical Methods: Students will understand and have experience evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the methods of empirical research undertaken by anthropologists.
  2. Anthropological Theory: Students will be able to interpret anthropological data in order to develop meaningful insights into culture and societies past and present.
  3. Global Diversity, Past and Present: Students will gain a substantive understanding of patterns of social and cultural diversity across the globe in both the present and the past.
  4. Critical Thinking: Students will be able to critically evaluate alternative perspectives on contemporary social issues through the analysis of empirical data interpreted through the lens of anthropological theory.
  5. Thought into Action: Students will be able to translate critical thought into action with the goal of anticipating, solving, and preventing social problems in order to improve the human and global condition.

Sociology Major/Minor

  1. Methods and Data Analysis (quantitative and qualitative): Students will be able to understand the strengths and weaknesses and apply a variety of sociological research methods.
  2. Application of sociological theory (classical and contemporary): Students will be able to apply sociological theories as they critically evaluate social phenomena at different levels of analysis (individuals and societies).
  3. Diversity/Inequality: Students will be able to understand how social categories (such as race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, etc.) are socially constructed and negotiated, and oftentimes transformed into patterns of inequality.
  4. Critical Thinking: Students will be able to critically evaluate alternative perspectives on contemporary social issues through the analysis of empirical data interpreted through the lens of sociological theory.
  5. Thought into Action: Students will be able to translate critical thought into action with the goal of anticipating, solving, and preventing social problems in order to improve the human and global condition.

Anthropolgy-Sociology Major/Minor

  1. Empirical Methods and Data Analysis: Students will be able to understand the strengths and weaknesses and apply a variety of anthropological and sociological research methods.
  2. Application of theory: Students will be able to apply anthropological and sociological theories as they critically evaluate cultural and social phenomena past and present.
  3. Global Diversity/Inequality: Students will have a substantive understanding of patterns of social and cultural diversity across the globe in both the present and the past, examining how social categories (such as race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, etc.) are constructed and negotiated, and oftentimes transformed into patterns of inequality.
  4. Critical Thinking: Students will be able to critically evaluate alternative perspectives on contemporary social issues through the analysis of empirical data interpreted through the lens of anthropological and sociological theories.
  5. Thought into Action: Students will be able to translate critical thought into action with the goal of anticipating, solving, and preventing social problems in order to improve the human and global condition.

Programs

    MajorMinor

    Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Programs of Study