Jul 07, 2020  
2019-2020 Academic Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Academic Catalog

English


Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Programs of Study

Faculty

Danit Brown, chair and associate professor.
B.A., Oberlin College; B.A., Tel Aviv University; M.F.A., Indiana University. Appointed 2005.

Lauren Brown, assistant professor.
B.A., SUNY, Geneseo; M.A., Binghamton University, Ph.D., Binghamton University. Appointed 2019.

Nels A. Christensen, associate professor.
A.B., California State University, Chico; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University. Appointed 2006.

Mary L. Collar, professor.
B.A., The University of Wisconsin; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. Appointed 1977.

Ian F. MacInnes, professor.
B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. Appointed 1994.

Helena G. Mesa, professor.
B.A., Indiana University; M.F.A., University of Maryland; Ph.D., University of Houston. Appointed 2003.

Ashley Miller, assistant professor.
B.A., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University. Appointed 2015.

Krista Quesenberry, visiting assistant professor.
B.A., Ball State University; M.A., Pennsylvania State University, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. Appointed 2018.

Jessica F. Roberts, professor.
A.B., Dartmouth College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. Appointed 2005.

Introduction

The Albion College English curriculum is designed to provide training in literary analysis, research, and written communication. The major prepares students to read critically, to evaluate information, and to express ideas with clarity and grace. The department offers courses in English and U.S. literatures and traditions, creative writing, journalism, and literary theory. The curriculum includes the intensive study of the works of major writers, major periods of literary history, and the development of literary types. Upper-division courses provide experience in critical approaches to literature; many explore certain theoretical considerations implicit in literary study, such as the question of canon formation and the impact of gender, race and ethnicity, and class on the creation and reception of literary works. Courses in writing and language are designed to develop students’ mastery of their language and their capacity for rigorous analysis. The writing curriculum includes basic and advanced work in expository writing, poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

English Department Website

Career Opportunities

In addition to preparing students for the advanced study of language and literature, majoring in English is excellent preparation for professional study in law, linguistics, library science, higher education administration, and public relations. Trained to read carefully and write clearly, students go on to a wide variety of careers in which language and research play an important role, including journalism, editing and writing, and elementary and secondary teaching. Moreover, many students have chosen English as a second major in recent years, using it to extend and strengthen their preparation for medicine, business, and a variety of other fields.

Special Features

English majors enjoy a rich variety of research, writing, and internship opportunities both on and off-campus. Writing and editorial positions on the online student newspaper and the annual literary magazine are available, and the department helps place students in off-campus programs in Great Britain, New York, Chicago, and Philadelphia. In the past several years, majors have completed off-campus internships with the Detroit Free Press, Priority Health, Dutton (an imprint of Penguin), and Donadio & Olson literary agency. Recent graduates have gone on to work for MLive, Quicken Loans, Comcast Sportsnet Chicago, and the Country Music Hall of Fame, as well as to publish books of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.

The department encourages qualified and interested majors to consider writing an honors thesis in English during their senior year. Successful completion of the thesis results in graduation with departmental honors in English.

Outstanding English majors are invited to join the Joseph J. Irwin Society, the English Department honor society.

The English Department sponsors a series of programs each year which bring distinguished writers and critics to campus for readings, lectures, and meetings with classes. Campus visitors have included Carl Hiaasen, Natasha Tretheway, Jason Reynolds, Jaclyn Friedman, Rita Williams-Garcia, Kiese Laymon, Julianna Baggott, and Chen Chen.

Departmental Policy on Advanced Placement Credit

Students who earn a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam in English literature and composition will receive credit for English 100X (elective credit). Students who earn a 4 on the AP exam in English language and composition will receive credit for English 100X (elective credit), those who earn a score of 5 will receive credit for ENGL 101 .

Student Learning Outcomes

Literature Major Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the ability to identify and revise for sentence-level grammatical errors and stylistic effects
  2. Identify the parts of a literary text, describe the relationship among those parts, and explain the way they work together to produce meaning
  3. Articulate the value and consequence of imaginative literature
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of a literary text’s context and audience
  5. Define and apply the terminology of literary study

Literature Minor Objectives

  1. Demonstrate the ability to identify and revise for sentence-level grammatical errors and stylistic effects
  2. Identify the parts of a literary text, describe the relationship among those parts, and explain the way they work together to produce meaning
  3. Articulate the value and consequence of imaginative literature
  4. Define and apply the terminology of literary study

Creative writing objectives

  1. Identify the parts of a literary text, describe the relationship among those parts, and explain the way they work together to produce meaning
  2. Demonstrate the ability to analyze and craft sentences that produce a variety of stylistic effects to evoke particular responses from the reader.
  3. Apply understanding of form and technique to students’ own original creative work.
  4. Articulate, evaluate, and justify creative choices at each stage of the revision process.
  5. Articulate the value and consequence of imaginative literature.
  6. Demonstrate the professional habits of creative writers: revision, workshopping, and submission for publication.

Professional writing objectives:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to identify and revise for sentence-level grammatical errors and stylistic effects
  2. Identify the parts of a document, describe the relationship among those parts, and explain the way they work together to produce meaning
  3. Articulate, evaluate, and justify professional writing choices at each stage of the revision process
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of a professional document’s context and audience
  5. Convey information and express ideas using methods that are applicable to a variety of professional fields.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to work as part of a team. 

Programs

    MajorMinor

    Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: Programs of Study